The Next Steps After Wrongful Death

Nov 14, 2017 by

It is perhaps the worst thing that can happen to a person. A call comes at night, or a doctor comes out of surgery and wakes you, and you discover not just that someone you love has died, but that it didn’t have to happen at all.

Wrongful death, which according to the John Michael Bailey Injury Lawyers can include deaths from car accidents, truck accidents, motorcycle accidents, and medical malpractice, is, in fact, a double tragedy: it is a loss and it is the unnecessariness of the loss.

This second point should not be neglected. It is hard enough to lose someone when there is time to prepare for it and reason for it. Someone dying of cancer is awful, but it allows time to say goodbye, and it allows people to comprehend the death. Even if cancer feels arbitrary, there is some reason behind it. It’s a matter of the life choices or environment of a person, or else just their DNA. But there’s a reason.

When a grandparent dies, there’s an understanding that this is part of life, the natural order, and that is a comfort.

All of that is robbed from someone trying to get over a wrongful death. For them, not only is the act sudden (and so without any chance to prepare), it is also unnatural. It comes from the inattention for another driver or from a slippery road or from a doctor who just wasn’t doing their job correctly.

Such a situation can be completely emotionally and psychologically crushing. So, how can someone get over it?

The answer, on some level, is that most people never get over it. They can, however, learn to live with this pain. First and foremost, it’s recommended they find a counselor to speak with. Having someone trained in guiding people through grief can be helpful on a number of levels. There is the freedom to speak completely honestly and openly which can be impossible in other situations.

Imagine a mother, for instance, who cannot allow her grief to flow freely because she must be strong for her children after the death of the father. A counselor will allow her to grieve openly.

Counselors also have techniques and advice that can help make the event comprehensible. Finding a reason behind what happened can be very helpful. It makes the event life-sized and understandable.

The other important point to consider is to talk to a lawyer. Not only is there potential compensation for what happened, going through the process of a wrongful death suit can also make the event more real. It allows those who have survived to understand what happened, why it happened, and if there is guilt to be assigned.

Finally, anyone going through this is advised to find friends and family who can comfort them and help take some of the burdens off of them for an extended period. That mother in the above example is probably in no shape to work and take care of her children alone. Finding a community there to support can make the pain of grief easier to tackle. When there’s help for other things, people can concentrate on themselves.

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